Did you know that humans would rather be at war than be alone?

We desire a tribal sense of belonging that is missing from modern life. 


According to the World Health Organization, people in wealthy countries suffer eight times the depression rate of those in poorer ones. But when we revert to the tribe, things improve.


Junger, an American journalist and former war correspondent spent time embedded with U.S. troops in Afghanistan, and says he was never alone there. 

Soldiers slept a dozen to a shelter. You couldn’t stretch out an arm without touching someone. Men of all colors, classes and creeds bonded as they had to look out for one another.

In a tribe the survival of the individual depends upon the survival of the group. The lack of this brotherhood is what makes it so hard for returning combat veterans to reintegrate into contemporary, fragmented societies.


As the novel coronavirus continues to call for increased preventative measures, we know it’s not always easy to practice social distancing in shared living spaces.


Coliving concepts are feeling challenged by the task of keeping everyone healthy and distanced while maintaining some degree of normalcy and productivity. The shelter-in-place (SIP) requirements make it difficult for some residents to know how to operate.

 

We just published an article with a public health expert on all the wellness measures you can take which is great for those needing tips on how to stay well in shared spaces, so this piece is more about what to do in all that downtime.

 

We’ll also explore more of the pros and cons of being alone vs. with a tribe during times like these.


We know that many coliving spaces are getting cancellations but not closing entirely. After all, this is many people’s permanent homes and they don’t have the option of going somewhere else. 


Nor do they necessarily want to. 

 

 

Instead, we want to be realistic about the fact that people in coliving homes will still have some degree of interaction with others-- and that’s okay. It just means that people will have to update their new normal during this time to stay safe. 


People need community and support more than ever.


You might have noticed that the emptiness of store shelves while some hoard toilet paper and others are entirely out, showcases the worst parts of our humanity.


We need to realize that human nature played a role in getting us into this mess, but it can also get us out.


Share that extra food with someone that really needs it. 


Make sure the people around you are doing okay.


This doesn’t mean jeopardizing yourself or them in the process, though.

 

The tribe has always been an important way to increase survival. 

Humans need other people-- there’s no question about it.

We’re not wired to be alone.


Think of it this way: if someone is sick right now and they’re all by themselves, it’s much harder to completely self-quarantine because they need to get things like food, medicine, and other essentials. They might be forced to go outside and risk infecting others to do these things. 


On the other hand, if someone is sick and has a nearby tribe, they can self-quarantine in their own space without going out as much because the tribe can safely send them what they need, leave things at their door, etc. 


If you compare the two, the people all alone pose more of a risk.

 

For those who are laying low in a shared living space, consider activities like these...


Reading

Take some time to recenter and curl up with some great books and content. 

Expand your knowledge in those areas that you always wanted to.


Organizing

While you’re already cleaning things up and disinfecting, consider a little Konmari-method decluttering. Not only will it make things healthier, but it can also cleanse your mind and provide a welcomed new environment.


Online Learning

Dive into those corners of YouTube or sign up for a course and learn more about your favorite topics that you always wanted to. 


Watch Inspirational Talks

Explore some TedTalks or conversations to expand your perspective.


Meditate

As common as this suggestion sounds, it really does help. Clear your mind, breathe deeply, and send out love. It comes right back.


Go Outside for a Walk or Hike (if your city allows)

There is a big possibility that more cities in California (and others) will mandate staying home, so try to get out as much as possible while you can. Fresh air makes a big difference for your immunity and mental health.

 

Our team continues to work remotely and we are incredibly grateful to be able to keep all operations running as normal to keep providing you with the coliving software to make things easier during this time and always. 

 

Sending healing thoughts to everyone during this time. 

We WILL all come out the other side of this.

 

As we stand together against coronavirus, it is giving humans the opportunity to really reflect on what is important. There will be a positive outcome after we all pull through this collectively.

 

Remember how community spirit in the U.S. skyrocketed after 9/11? The suicide rate dropped dramatically. There were no rampage shootings in public places like schools and colleges for two years.

This was just the U.S., now imagine on a global scale.

 

Our team continues to work remotely and we are incredibly grateful to be able to keep all operations running as normal to keep providing you with the coliving software to make things easier during this time and always. 

 

Sending healing thoughts to everyone during this time. 

 

Kndrd: Technology to facilitate the living in CoLiving ?

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